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CHAPTER V
COVERS

IN weaving larger baskets the number of spokes as well as their length must of course be increased and in order to accustom himself to the handling of these extra spokes the worker is advised to make a


Large Mat with Open Border No. 2

Materials: 6 16-inch spokes of No. 4 rattan,

1 9-inch spoke of No. 4 rattan,

3 weavers of No. 2 rattan.

Three vertical and three horizontal spokes are arranged as in the first mat, and the half spoke (so called for convenience but which is, as always, one inch longer than half the length of the others, to allow for binding) is placed between any two of the upper vertical spokes. It should never be on the outside of the group. A weaver is started and bound around three times, the spokes are then separated and the weaving begins. Three weavers are used and then the mat is bound off and finished with Open Border No. 2.

The child who does not appreciate mats will be entirely won over when he sees some of the fas­cinating things that can be made with them. For example a tiny wicker table just the size for a doll's house and the shape for an afternoon tea!


Doll's Table of Rattan

Materials: 6 22-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan,

  1 12-inch spoke of No. 3 rattan,

  1 weaver of No. 2 rattan,

  A piece of fine wire 2 or 3 inches long,

    Raffia,

  A knitting needle.


Two groups of spokes, one of three and the other of three and a half, are crossed in the centre and woven into a mat, which when it is three and a half inches in diameter is bound off. Each spoke is brought across the next one and pressed down beside the next as in Open Border No. 2, with the difference that the long end is not cut off, but brought out between the fourth and fifth rows of weaving on the under side of the mat. The border is drawn in so that it will not be over a quarter of an inch beyond the weaving. The long ends of the spokes (which are to form the legs of the table) are brought together and bound with a piece of fine wire just under the centre. They are then separated into three groups of four each. The odd spoke is either cut off or whittled very thin and bound in with one of the three groups. A strand of raffia, either double or single, is now started at the top of one of the groups and wound tightly around until it has covered the desired length. At the end a half hitch, or one button-hole stitch, is made to keep the raffia from slipping and then it is wound up again to the top. It is brought down the second leg as far as the first one was wound, then it is turned with a half hitch and brought up again in the same way. The third leg is also wound down and up again with a half hitch at the bottom to hold it. After this third leg has been covered the raffia is brought in and out between the legs where they separate in order to spread them more effectually. It is then tied and the ends cut close. Finally the spokes at the end of each leg are cut to a uniform length, and slanting, so that the table will stand firmly.


Doll's Chair of Rattan

Materials: 6 20-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan

  1 11-inch spoke of No. 3 rattan,

  4 10-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan,

  1 piece of No. 3 rattan about 9 inches long,

  2 weavers of No. 2 rattan,

  Raffia

  A knitting needle


Again the mat comes into play. This time as the seat of a miniature high backed chair made of rattan. Groups of twenty-inch spokes, one of three and the other of three and a half, are crossed in the centre, bound around twice with a weaver of No. 2 rattan and woven into a mat three inches in diameter. Each spoke is brought down beside the next one, as in Open Border No. 1, except that the long end is threaded through between the second and third rows of weaving on the under side of the mat. When all have been brought out in this way underneath the mat, or seat, the four groups of three ends each which are to form the legs, should be so divided that the vertical spokes in the centre of the chair seat shall run toward the front and back of the seat. The thirteenth spoke is whittled to a thin point and bound in with one of the other groups, which are wound with raffia down to the end, turned with a half hitch and then brought up again. A neat way to start the raffia is to thread it across a row of weaving just above the group it is to bind. A ring of No. 3 rattan about nine inches long is coiled and held within the space inclosed by the legs, about half way down, where it is wound around with a strand of raffia and bound securely to each leg The back of the chair is formed by inserting a number of spokes of No. 3 rattan, ten inches long beside those in the seat and at that part of the seat which has been chosen for the back. It is woven back and forth with No. 2 weaver. Needless to say the weaver must be a very pliable one in order to make the sharp turns that are necessary on the sides. Individual taste and skill here has an excellent opportunity to show itself, and an ingenious child will find that he can construct almost any kind of a back he chooses. The outside spokes of the chair back in the picture are each brought over and down beside the other one; while the inner spokes are crossed in the centre and run down beside the outer spokes, form­ing a narrow, oval back which is woven back and forth as far up as the crossing of the inner spokes. If arms are desired more spokes will be necessary. In this case the outer spokes are woven in with the others for a few rows and then bent over and for­ward to form the arms. They are cut to the desired length and each is inserted beside one of the side spokes in the seat. Having exhausted, for the present, the possibilities of the mat we will return to the real subject of the chapter — covers, with apologies for the digression.


Small Round Basket with Slightly Rounded Cover

   Materials: BASKET - 6 16-inch spokes of No. 4 rattan,

            1 9-inch spoke of No. 4 rattan,

            4 weavers of No. 2 rattan.

COVER, HINGE, ETC.-6 14-inch spokes of No. 4 rattan,

8-inch spoke of No 4 rattan,

1 1/2 weavers of No. 2 rattan,

A knitting needle.

The bottom is woven in the same way as the large mat, to a diameter of one and three-eighths inches; when the spokes are wet and rounded up over the finger. The sides are woven with loosely drawn weavers until three have been used. The fourth weaver is drawn tighter so that the basket shall be somewhat the shape of an orange with the top cut off. The edge is bound and finished with this border. The spokes are soaked until pliable, and each is brought back of the next one on the right and then out. This goes on around the bas­ket. The end of each spoke in turn is then brought over the first spoke on the right, and pressed down inside the basket just behind the second spoke on the right and next to the weaving.

The cover is woven like the bottom, except that from the very centre the spokes are bent gradually up. One full-length weaver should make a large enough cover. It is then bound off and finished with a Rope Border. Each spoke in succession is brought across the next spoke to the right and then inside the cover. When the circuit of the cover has been made, each end of a spoke is brought across the next spoke to the right and then pressed down inside the cover where, after the border is finished, they are cut just long enough to allow each end to lie across the next spoke.



COVERED BASKETS
The small rattan basket with a slightly rounded cover, which is shown in the foreground, is the simplest of these baskets. The cover of the one on the right is as deep as the basket itself. Above and to the left is a pale green basket with a flat cover and the one on the extreme left has a band of braided raffia on basket and over.


Fastenings. Three rings of No. 2 rattan are made as follows. A piece of rattan about a foot long, which has been soaked until pliable, is tied into a ring. The ends are then twisted in and out once around the foundation ring (see Fig. 12), or when a heavier ring is required, twice or three times. One of the rings should be smaller than the other two, and none of them need be over three-quarters of an inch in diameter. The smallest one is attached to the cover in front, across a Spoke and between the border and the last row of weaving, each end being sewed off under a spoke, then over one and inside the cover, where it is cut off.


FIG. 12.

Another ring is attached in the same way at the back of the cover, and the third one is fastened across a spoke in the front of the basket, between the third and fourth rows of weaving. To complete the hinge the cover is put in position so that the ring at the back of the cover will be just above a spoke on the basket. The end of a small piece of No. 2 weaver is then pressed in between the third and fourth rows of weaving to the left of the spoke referred to, and brought out on the right of the spoke. The ends are then crossed, brought through the ring on the cover, and drawn up just tight enough to allow the cover to close easily. The end which started on the left of the spoke is brought to the right and fastened, as the rings were, between the border and the last row of weaving on the basket, while the end which started from the right of the spoke crosses to the left, and is fastened in the same way between the border and the last row of weaving. If desired this basket may be varnished, see Chapter XII.


Green Rattan Basket with Flat Cover

      Materials: BASKET-8 16-inch spokes of No. 4 rattan,

      1 9-inch spoke of No. 4 rattan,

      5 1/2 weavers of No. 2 rattan.

COVER, HINGE, ETC.- 6 16-inch spokes of No. 4 rattan,

             1 9-inch spoke of No. 4 rattan,

             4 weavers of No. 2 rattan,

             A knitting needle.

This is an excellent shape for candy or for a small work basket and though it is so simple if it is well made and colored the result is most satis­factory. The basket is started with eight sixteen and one nine-inch spoke of No. 4 rattan, bound three times with No. 2 weaver and woven into a bottom three inches and a quarter in diameter. The spokes are then wet and rounded up into a bowl shape which, when five weavers have been used in under-and-over weaving, should be drawn in gradually with the remaining half weaver until the top of the basket is five and a half inches in diameter. It is then bound off and finished with this border. Each spoke is brought over the next one on the right and pressed down inside the basket where, after the border is finished, the ends are cut just long enough to allow each to lie against the spoke in front of it.

The cover has two groups of sixteen-inch spokes, one of three and the other of three and a half which are crossed in the usual way and bound three times. It is woven like the large mat until its diameter is about five inches when the edge is bound off and finished with the Rope Border already described on page 39.

The hinge and fastening are made as follows. Having chosen the best place for the hinge on basket and cover an end of a piece of No. 2 rattan, about a foot long, (which has been wet until pliable) is inserted at the right of a spoke and under the last row of weaving on the basket. It is then woven under and over two or three spokes to fasten it securely. The long end is crossed diagonally over the border of the cover and pressed in between the last two rows of weaving at the left of a spoke. It is then brought down inside and out again at the left of the spoke on the basket and across to the right of the spoke in the cover, where it is pressed inside and down to the place where it started on the basket. Here it is woven under and over several spokes till it is firmly attached. The front fastening is formed of two rings, also trade of No. 2 rattan, see page 39. The ring on the cover should be smaller than the one on the basket so that it may slip through it. In attaching the one on the cover, the ends are pushed inside the basket between the border and the last row of weaving, and woven under and over two or three spokes until the ring is secure. The ring on the basket is fastened in the same way, except that the ends are inserted between the fourth and fifth rows of weaving from the top, one on either side of a spoke. The basket is then colored pale green, see Chapter XII.


Basket with Deep Cover leaving Rounded Sides

Materials: BASKET-8 18-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan,

                        1 10-inch spoke of No. 3 rattan,

                       4 weavers of No. 2 rattan.

COVER AND FASTENINGS- 8 18-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan,

1 10-inch spoke of No. 3 rattan,

5 weavers of No. 2 rattan,

A knitting needle

A bottom, slightly raised in the centre, is woven to a diameter of two and a half inches. After the spokes have been wet until pliable they are bent up in a rounded flare, like a saucer in shape. Four weavers are used in under-and-over weaving, and the basket should then be about five and a quarter inches in diameter. The edge is bound off and a border made in this way. Each spoke is brought under the next spoke on the right, then over one and inside of the basket. The first part of the border should be left loose and open so that the last spokes can be more easily woven in.

The cover is made in the same way as the basket, except that the spokes are bent gradually up from the centre in a rounded flare. When four weavers have been used, and the cover is exactly the size of the basket, it is bound off and completed with the simple border made by bringing each spoke over the one on the right and down inside.

A ring (see Fig. 12) is attached to the front of the cover, another one at the back, and a third and slightly larger one is fastened on to the basket (just below the one on the front of the cover) across a spoke, and between the second and third rows of weaving from the top.

A knob by which to lift the cover is made of a pliable piece of No. 2 rattan about a foot long. A knitting needle is run in between the spokes and the binding, at the right of the upper vertical spokes in the centre of the cover, making a space through which an end of the piece of rattan is in­serted and fastened off on the wrong side, by weaving it under and over one or two spokes. The long end is brought diagonally across to the left of the lower vertical spokes, where it is pushed through (with the aid of the knitting needle) leaving a loop about half an inch high on top. It then crosses on the wrong side to the place where it started.

This is repeated until there are four loops of the same height and close together. The end is then brought out at the right of the lower vertical spokes and woven over the first two loops, under the next two, and in at the left of the upper verti­cal spokes. The second time across, it is again brought over the first two loops and under the second The third time the weaver crosses, it goes under the first two loops, over the second and in; while the fourth follows the third in the same way. The end is then fastened off on the wrong side, completing the knob.



LARGE MAT AND DOLL'S FURNITURE
The starting of a large mat is shown in the upper left-hand corner of the plate, with the finished mat beside it. The tiny chair, table and foot-stool are begun in the same way.


Basket with Overlapping Cover

Materials: BASKET- 8 18-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan,

        1 10-inch spoke of No. 3 rattan,

4 1/2 weavers of No. 2 rattan,

6 strands of raffia, braided.

COVER AND RING- 8 16-inch spokes of No. 3 rattan,

1 9-inch spoke of No. 3 rattan,

       4 or 5 weavers of No. 2 rattan,

6 strands of raffia, braided,

       A knitting needle.


Before beginning this basket the raffia will have to be braided, as described in Chapter II, into two pieces of equal length; one for the band on the basket and the other for the cover. The bottom of the basket is woven, slightly raised in the centre, to a diameter of four and a half inches; the spokes are then wet until pliable and turned sharply up­ward. Straight sides are woven of half an inch of triple twist, then three rows of braided raffia and another half inch of triple twist, which should end at the same place on the circumference of the bas­ket as it began. In ending, each weaver is cut just long enough to allow it to be pressed down beside the next spoke for about half an inch below the edge of the basket. The border is woven from right to left (instead of left to right as is usual in closed borders), which makes it harmonize better with the triple twist. Each spoke is brought under the spoke to the left, over the next spoke and down inside; the beginning of the border being left open so that the last spokes may be easily woven in.

Cover. — Eight and a half sixteen-inch spokes are divided into two groups, one of four and the other of four and a half, and started in a flat centre which is woven to a diameter of an inch and three-quarters. The braided raffia is then joined to the rattan, by crossing the ends back of a spoke, and woven into four rows. The rattan is then started again and continued in under-and-over weaving until the cover is five inches in diameter when the spokes are thoroughly wet and turned sharply up­ward. Seven-eighths of an inch of triple twist is woven into straight sides for the overlapping cover. It is finished with a border in one row, woven from right to left as was the border of the basket. Each spoke is brought over the next spoke, under the succeeding one and then out, where it is cut, after the border is made, just long enough to allow the end to lie against the spoke in front.

A ring, not quite an inch in diameter, of No. 2 rattan twisted around three times, is a necessary addition. It makes a sturdy little handle with which to raise the cover. After the ends have been twisted around the circumference of the ring as described elsewhere in this chapter, they are in­serted, with the aid of a knitting needle, one on either side of the vertical spokes in the very centre of the cover, and woven under and over one or two spokes till firmly fastened, when they are cut off on the inside.


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