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CHAPTER XXII.

They arrive at Paita, where they are disappointed of their expectations, as not daring to land, seeing all the country alarmed before them. They bear away for the Strait of Magellan. Description of the bay and port of Paita, and Colan. An account of their Sailings towards the Strait afore-mentioned


THURSDAY, August 25th. The night before this day, we stood off to sea for fear of the shore, and lest we should be descried from the coast of Paita, to which we were now pretty nigh. About noon this day we began to stand in again, and saw the homing of the land, though with hazy weather. The next day, being August 26th, we had cold winds, great dews, and dry weather.

Saturday, August 27th. All this day, but more especially in the morning, we had many fogs. In the afternoon we saw la Silla de Paita at W.S.W. being about five leagues distant from it.

Sunday, August 28th. Last night about ten o'clock we were close into land, at the distance of half a league more or less to leeward of the island of Lobos. We continued our course all that night, and about break of day found ourselves close under Pena Horadada, a high and steep rock so-called. From hence we sailed with a landwind, and sent away from the ship two canoes well manned and armed, with good hopes to have taken the town of Paita undescried. But as it should seem, they had already received news of our coming, or being upon that coast, and also had received supplies of forces that were sent them from the city of Piura, distant thence twelve leagues up country. These supplies consisted chiefly of three companies of horse and foot, all of them being armed with fire-arms. Besides this, they had made a breast-work along the seaside for the defence of the town, and the great church which lies at the outermost part of the town. From these places, as also from a hill that covers the town, they fired at our men, who were innocently rowing towards shore with their canoes. This preposterous firing was the preservation of our people, for had the Spaniards permitted our men to come ashore, they had assuredly destroyed them every man. But fear always hinders that nation of victory, at least in most of our attempts.

Our men perceiving themselves to be discovered, and the enemy prepared for their reception, hereupon retreated, and came on board the ship again without attempting to land, or do anything else in relation to the taking of the place. We judged there could not be less than one hundred and fifty fire-arms, and four times as many lances upon the shore, all in readiness to hinder our people from landing. Within the town our pilot told us, there might be one hundred and fifty families.

Being disappointed of our expectations at Paita we stood down the bay towards Colan. This is another town so called, and which exceeds Paita three times. It is chiefly inhabited by fishermen, and thence they send fish to most inland towns of Peru; and also serve Paita with water from the river Colan, not far distant from the town. It is two leagues more or less from the town of Paita afore-mentioned to Colan, and thence to the river, one league, although the houses of Colan do reach almost to the river. The town of Colan itself is only inhabited by Indians, and these are all rich; because they will be paid in ready money for everything they do for the Spaniards. But the town of Paita is chiefly inhabited by Spaniards, though there be also some Indians; but the Spaniards do not suffer the Indians to be any great gainers, or grow rich under them.

About ten o'clock a young breeze sprang up, and with that we stood away W., and W. by S. Within a little while it blew so fresh, that we were forced to reef our topsails, the weather being very dark and hazy. I took the port of Paita, and bay of Colan, as they lay exactly situated (see map on next page).

Monday, August 29th. All our hopes of doing any further good upon the coasts of the South Sea being now frustrated, seeing we were descried before our arrival wherever we came, we resolved unanimously to quit all other attempts, and bear away for the Strait of Magellan in order to return homewards either for England or some of our plantations in the West Indies. This day we had a great dew, and I reckoned myself W. S.W. from Paita thirteen leagues and a half, with very little wind. So we stood E.

The next day, August 30th, we had misty weather. We made a W.S.W. way, and by it five leagues and one third. In the afternoon of this day, the wind freshened again, having been but little before, and we stood E. S. E.

The last day of August we had very fair weather. I believed now that the wind was settled at S.E. and S.S.E. We made a S.S.W. way, and twenty-one leagues and two thirds.

September 1st. Last night was very cloudy, but withal we had a fresh gale. Our reckoning was a S.W. by S. way, and that we had made sixteen leagues and two thirds.

September 2nd. We reckoned a S.W. way, and by it twenty-six leagues and two thirds. This day we had an observation, and found lat. 7 40' S.

September 3rd brought us both cloudy and misty weather. We made a W.S.W. way, and fourteen leagues.

September 4th. This day the wind was at E.S.E. and sometimes E. coming in many flaws. We had a S.W. by S. way, and reckoned twenty-three leagues and two thirds. We had a great sea from S.




Monday, September 5th, we had great winds, and a high and short sea. Our way was S.S.W. and half W. by which we reckoned twenty-eight leagues and two thirds of a league.

September 6th, we had a very fresh wind at S.E. by E. with an indifferent smooth sea. By observation we found this day latitude 12 00' S. We made a S.W. by S. way, and twenty-eight leagues and one third.

Wednesday, September 7th, we had a very fresh wind. We reckoned a S.W. by S. way, and thirty-six leagues. We observed latitude 13 24' S. We make now for each mess a plum pudding of salt water and wine lees.

On the eighth we enjoyed a fresh gale of wind, though with hazy weather. Our reckoning was a S.W. by S. way, and hereby twenty-five leagues, and one third of a league.

September 9th, we made a S.W. by S. way, and twenty-one leagues and a third. In the afternoon the wind came about something more S., allowing us a S.W. course.

Saturday, September loth. All last night past and this morning the wind was very fresh at E. Our way was S.S.W. and by our reckoning thirty-five leagues and one third. The weather now was warm. An observation this day gave us latitude 16 40' S.

September 11th we had whiffling winds. A S.W. half S. way, and thereby twelve leagues and two thirds. By an observation we found 17 to' S. Now we had a very great sea, so that we took in our sprit sail.

September 12th. All the night before this day we were under a pair of courses, yet this morning we heaved out main topsail. We made a W.S.W. way, and seventeen leagues and one third. By observation we found lat. 17 30' S.

The 13th. During last night we had huge and great storms of wind. In the morning our goose head gave way, so that at about noon we were forced to lie by till four in the afternoon to mend it. Our course was S.W. half W. and our reckoning twenty-nine leagues, and two thirds of a league. Lat. by observation 18 12' S.

Wednesday, September 14th. This day we had very hazy weather. We made a S.S.W. way, and twenty leagues.

September 15th. This day likewise we had a S.S.W. way, and reckoned twenty-three leagues and one half. Our observation taken this day gave us 20 09' S.

On September P5th we had a clear day, a S.W. half S. way, and made sixteen leagues and two thirds. We found by observation, lat. 20 48' S.

The 17th. Last night was very calm. Also this day, it being a full moon. We reckoned a S.W. way, and only by reason of the calmness of the weather nine leagues and one third of a league, We had an observation which afforded us 21 08' S. lat.

Sunday, September 18th. Last night a wind sprang up at S.S.E. which the morning of this day freshened at S.E. We made a W.S.W. way, and by it eighteen leagues. Moreover, this clay we had a clear observation that showed us lat. 21 30' S.

September 19th. All last night we had a very fresh wind, but this morning it came about to E. by S. and E.S.E. with hazy weather. I reckoned a S.W. by S. way, and twenty-two leagues.

September 20th. This day gave us a fresh wind, hazy weather, a S. by W. way, and hereupon twenty-three leagues and one third.

September 21st. This day also the fresh gale continued, with cloudy, and sometimes misty weather. Our reckoning showed us a S. by W. way as the day before, and by it twenty-eight leagues and one third. By an observation made, we found lat. 25 15' S.

Thursday, September 22nd. This day we had a very fresh wind. We reckoned a S. half W. way, and by that twenty-nine leagues and two thirds. An observation taken gave us lat. 26 42' S. We observed this day a N.E. sea, which seemed very strange to us.

The next day we had several showers of small rain. My reckoning was a S. by W. way; and thereupon twenty-six leagues. We found by observation lat. 27 57' S.

September 24th. We had hazy weather, and the wind not so fresh at E.S.E., with a smooth sea. We made a S.S.W. way half westerly, and twenty-three leagues and two thirds. This day also an observation gave us lat. 28 57' S. I reckoned now that we were distant from Paita 302 leagues and two thirds.

Sunday, September 25th. This day we had not much wind, and hazy weather. At noon the wind came E., then E.N.E. and then again N.E. by E. We reckoned a S. by E. way, half E. and 55.

Monday 26th. We had hazy weather and a fresh wind at N.E. We reckoned a S.E. half S. way, and twenty-four leagues. In the afternoon we experienced a N.N.E. sea, and then soon after a N.N.E. wind. After this a N. wind, and that but very little.

September 27th. All the night before this day we had a fresh wind at N.N.E. About eight this morning, it came about again to N.N.W. We made a S.E. by S. way, and thirty-eight leagues. By observation I found lat. 32 30' S. Now we enjoyed a very smooth sea, and fair weather.

Wednesday, September 28th. In the night past a very fresh wind at N.N.W. and N.W. At break of day we had a wind at . . . heaving us aback at once. At noon again the wind was at S.W. our course being S.E. This morning we took down our top gallant masts. We made a S.E. by E. way, and on this road twenty-seven leagues and two thirds. By observation, lat. 33 16' S., a S.W. sea.

On the 29th we had very windy and hazy weather, with some rain now and then. All last night we handed our maintop sail. We made a S.E. by E. way, and thirty-two leagues and two thirds. We had a S.W. sea and wind.

Friday, September 3oth. This day we had fresh winds between S.W. and W. We reckoned a S.E. half S. way, and thereupon forty-four leagues. By observation we found lat. 35 54 S.

October 1st. The wind this day was not very fresh, but varying. My reckoning was a S.E. half S. way, and twenty-four leagues. An observation gave us 36 50' S. This day I finished another quadrant, being the third I finished in this voyage. We had a S.W. sea, with showers of rain and gusts of wind.

Sunday, October 2nd. The wind this day was hanging between W.N.W., and N.W. by N. We made a S.E. by S. way, and thirty-three leagues and two thirds. By observation we found 38' 14' S. About noon we had a fresh wind at N.W. and S.W.

October 3rd. Last night in the forepart thereof was clear, but the latter was rainy. The wind very fresh at N.W. by N., but this day we had little wind, and cloudy weather, a S.W. by W. wind, and a S.E. by S. way, by which we reckoned thirty-three leagues and one third.

October 4th. We had a clear night and very fresh wind. We reckoned a S.E. by S. way, and thereby forty-three leagues. By observation, lat. 41 34 S. This day also fell several showers of rain.

October 5th. We had a windy night, and a clear day. We reckoned a S.S.E. half E. way, and forty-four leagues and two thirds. By observation, lat. 43 26' S. The weather now was very windy, causing a huge tempestuous sea. The wind at N.W. and N.W. by N. blowing very high.

October 6th. This day the wind was still at N.W. and yet not so fresh as it was yesterday, the weather very foggy and misty. As for the wind it came in gusts, so that we were forced to hand our topsails, and spritsail. We reckoned a S.E. half S. way, and thereby forty-three leagues and one third. The seas now were not so high as for some days past. In the evening we scudded away under our fore course.

Friday, October 7th. Last night was very cloudy, and this day both dark and foggy weather with small rain. We made a S.E. way, and thirty leagues and two thirds. A fresh wind at N.N.W. and N.W. We keep still under a fore course, not so much for the freshness of the wind, as the closeness of the weather.

October 8th. We had a clear night the night before this day, and a strong gale; insomuch that this day we were forced to take in our foresail, and loosen our mizzen, which was soon blown to pieces. Our eldest seamen said that they were never in the like storm of wind before, the sea was all in a foam. In the evening it dulled a little. We made a S.E. half E. way, and eighteen leagues, with very dark weather.

Sunday, October 9th. All the past night we had a furious W.N.W. wind. We set our sail a drough, and so drove to the southward very much, and almost incredibly if an observation had not happened, which gave us lat. 48 15' S. We had a very stiff gale at W.N.W. with a great sea from W. which met with a S.S.W. sea as great as it. Now the weather was very cold, and we had one or two frosty mornings. Yesterday in the afternoon we had a very great storm of hail. At noon we bent another mizzen.

Monday, October 10th. This day brought us a fresh wind at N.W. and N.N.W. We made a S.E. half E. way, and by it forty-four leagues. By observation we found lat 49 41' S. I reckoned myself now to be east from Paita sixty-nine leagues and a half.

Tuesday Oct. 11th. Last night we had a small time calm. This day was both cloudy and rainy weather The wind at S.W. and S.S.W. so furious, that at ten o'clock this morning we scudded under a main sail. At noon we lowered our fore yard while we sailed. We made a S.E. by E. way, and thirty leagues.


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